• Games Testing Solutions

    We offer Game QA Testing services on most platforms which include iPhone, iPad, Android based Tablets/Mobile devices, PC, MAC etc

  • Automation Testing

    Automation testing is primarily used for performing regression testing of a product. Regression testing requires execution of Test Cases with every build.

  • Affordable Testing Solutions

    Precise Testing Solution are fully committed to deliver organize, systematic and best-in-class quality assurance, adopting latest authentic mythologies of industry..

Friday, 30 September 2011

For Almost Free Test Your Website Application ,Desktop Application and Mobile Application For Functional ,Performance And Security Testing through the automation and manual testing Method Please Mail me





We can help you to Test your application in different platform and different devices Like “Window” ,”Linux” and “Mac” ( Different Version) or ” iPhone”,” iPad” and “Tab”.

We are specialized in QTP, Loadrunner and WebInspect Tool and we enjoyed work on the Android and iPhone device. We can also help you in the game testing.





Note:-
1)I have Valid licence of HP-QTP(11.0) Software for Functional Testing
2)I have Valid licence of HP-LoadRunner(11.0) Software for Performance Testing

3)I have Valid licence of HP-WebInspect Software for Security Testing








Automation Testing Tool HP (QTP ) Syllabus


Introduction
  • About Test Automation
  • Conditions of the Test Automation to Be Used
  • Chances of Test Automation to Be Avoided
  • Automated Testing procedure
  • HP QTP in brief

QTP is Recording or Identification Logic
  • Scenario’s behind QTP is Recording procedure
  • Logic behind QTP Identification & replay Procedure
  • How to use the Identification Dialog box previously starts recording
  • Normal Recording,  Analog Recording and Low Level Recording with the real examples
Objects Identifications Configuration
  • Normal Identification
  • Mandatory Properties
  • Assertive Properties
  • Smart Identification
  • Base filter Properties
  • Option filter properties
  • Ordinal Identifier
  • Developing Tools and Settings Global
Virtual Objects Configurations
  • Virtual Object Manager
  • Determine a Virtual Object
  • Removing and Disabling Virtual Objects Definitions
 Objects Repository (OR)
  • Why Objects Repository required
  • How Object Repository works
  • Test and Run time articles with of TO Properties
  • Types of Objects Repository
  • Per Actions versus Shared Objects Repository
  • The Object Spy
  • User-defined Objects
  • Object Repository Shortcomings
  • Adding Objects
  • Renaming Objects
  • Deleting Objects
  • linking Objects Repositories to an Actions
  • Exporting Local Objects
  • Combining Repositories                   
Data Table’s
  • Design and run-time data table
  • When use the global and local data tables
  • Settings data tables iteration
  • Data table object model
  • Data Table Objects functions & Properties through real time
  • Data table formatting
Actions
  • Types of Actions
  • Inserts a Calls to Action
  • Inserts a Call to existent
  • Insert Call to New
  • Splitting Action
  • Insert Call to Copy
  • Creating an Action
  • Renaming an Action
  • Calling an existing
  • Deleting an Action
  • Making an Reusable/Non-Reusable
  • Action
  • Copying an Actions
  • Action area
QTP Environments Variable
  • Types of Environment variables
  • Environment Objects
  • Defining, modifying & associating environment variable
  • Loading Environment file at run-time (dynamic handling)
  • Environment Variables using (.in Extensions & .xml) via scripts & examples
Checkpoints
  • Types of checkpoints with explain on real time assumptions
  • Practicing with dissimilar checkpoints on populate application
  • Troubles at QTP built in checkpoints
  • Options to QTP checkpoint
  • Updates Checkpoints at execution time

Synchronization
  • Synchronization Points
  • Checking Object Existence
  • First Method – Use the Synchronization methods
  • Second Method – Use the Wait statements
  • Third Method – Wait attributes methods
  • Page Vs Browser Synchronization
Rectifying/Debugging in QTP
  • Establishing Debugging Configuration                                
  • Using Breakpoints                                                    
  • Works to the Watch Expressions Tab                                  
  • Works with the Variable Tabs                                         
  • Work with the Command’s Tab
  • Use of Step in to, Step Out, Step Over,
Recovery’s Scenario
  • What are the recovery scenarios?
  • When or when not to be use of Recovery Scenarios?
  • Conditions in which a recovery script won’t work
  • Recovery Scenario of IE Authentication windows
  • Default Recovery Scenarios
  • The Recovery object
  • Recovery Function Calls
  • Error Handling
 
Parameterization
  • Data Driven Testing’s by Loop statement
  • Dynamics Test Data’s Submissions by Looping
  • Data Driven Testing through Data Table
  • Up-loading Test Data from the External files such as Excel Files
  
      

VBScript basic &advanced program
VBScripts Basics to Advance usage
We know that in Manual testing field most of the peoples don’t have any use of writing scripting & programming languages so they don’t have any thought about Scripting. Good knowledge of Script can just help you to stand as a Automation Testers, So we will train you in Script from starting level to experience level without any idea about any time constraint because I know, when you will know the Basic Concepts or Practical knowledge of Script then model creation will become too ease for you in proper direction (anterior programming and scripting knowledge is not compulsory)

 Automation of the MS Excel, Register System Object, Automation of DB using Scripts, Dictionary Object, Integrating & working with QTP or Quality Center  All with the Practical examples & scripting with line to line definition. These components are well defined in our detailed syllabus attached with the mail.

 VBScript
  • What is VBScript and how to execute VBScripts?
  • VBScripts are the Basic syntax to live example
  • How to use and run if., Do While For Loop, Select Case, Then Else and till , while move to conditional conceptions on real time scenarios  through examples                                                  
  • Working with Fixed length of the arrays , Arrays , Dynamic Arrays   with examples                                               
  • Alternatives of arguments in VBScript
  • VBScript’s of important frequently used in creating functions & statements with the examples or line-by- line code defined with practice code to create trainees easy with VBScript
VB Script Fundamental & Feature
  • Scripting Language’s versus. Programming Languages
  • Basic Features of VBScript
  • Hosting Environments or Scripts Engines
  • Developing or Executing a Scripts
Data Type& Variables
  • VBScript data types
  • Declare the Variables & alternatives of Explicit Statement
  • Assign the Values to the Variables
  • Dynamic Arrays, Dimensional Arrays
  • Array Variables or Scalar Variables

VBScript Statements-
Dim Do Loop, Call,  Run, Exit, If and Else, ,Set ,For Next While Wend, option explicit, With On erroneousness resumes next, Public, Dim, On Error Go To 0, Redim, chose scenarios, functions
VB-Script Functions
(Is array, is empty, is numeric, is date, Trim, Mid, Split,  Now, Ltrim, Rtrim, LBound, Cdbl, Lcase, Ucase, Array, UBound, Date, Instr, Cint, Cdate, UBound Csng, LBound, Cstr etc.
VB-Script Objects
  • Regular Expression Object to Methods & Properties
  • Error Objects to Methods & Properties
  • Compare Object to Methods & Properties
Descriptive Programming
  • Advantages of Descriptive Programming
  • Static Programming
  • Dynamic Programming
  • Creating Library files using Constants /Collection objects
  • Handling Dynamic Objects
  • Handling duplicate Objects
  • Retrieving Child Objects
  • Regular Expressions
  • Regular Expression Characters
  • When use the Regular Expressions in QTP’s
  • Testing is a Regular Expression used code
  • Use a Regular Expression ,Identify the Dynamic Object
  • Replace information from the String Using Regular Expression 
  • Handling Dynamic Objects
  • Using Regular Expressions in Checkpoints
  • Defining Regular Expressions
  • Search Operations
  • Regular expressions in Recovery scenarios
  • Regular Expression Object
  • Dictionary Objects
  • What is Dictionary Object and what is the requirement of Dictionary Object
  • How to create dictionary object & use this.
  • What are the properties or methods of Dictionary Object with right-time scenarios & examples
  • Difference between Dictionary object and an Array.
  Library Files
  • linking a Library globally to the Test
  • Dynamically Loads libraries locally at execution time
  • Dynamically up-loading libraries globally at run-time
  • Understanding Execution Scope
  • Pertinence of alternative Explicit
  • Running code in Local range from within the Global range
User Defined Functions
  • Types of Procedures
  • Internal & External Functions
  • Creating Library files
  • Creating Sub Procedures
  • Creating Function Procedures
  • Associating Library registers (files)
  • Up- Loading Function Libraries execution time
  • Generic Functions
  • Project Specific Functions

QTP Automation Object Model
  • QTP Automation Objects Model (AOM)
  • Pass the arguments to the Test Cases
  • How to automate QTP at execution time dynamically through scripting
  • How to set per test settings at execution time through scripting
  • How to set Global Option at execution time through scripting
HTML DOM
  • When to use the HTML DOM
  • When not to use the HTML DOM
  • HTML DOM Objects & HTML Node
  • The Document Object
  • The HTML Element Object  & The HTML Element Collection
  • Getting the Web page Element using the DOM
Work to the Web Table
  • Web Tables
  • Accessing the Web Table
  • Using OR  and Descriptive Programming
  • Using an object inside the table
  • Get the place of object in the table
  • Click in a Web Table
  • delivers Web Table in Data Table
  • Extending Web Table functionality through writing user’s defined functions
  • Finds a block in Table

Working with Databases
  • Connects  with a Data base
  • Building Connection Strings
  • Check the level of Connection and Record set
  • Exporting the outcomes of the Query to the Data Table
  • Running a Stored Data Base process

Working with Microsoft Excel
  • The Excel Automation Object Model
  • MS-Excel’s object & their attributes with the main applicable methods
  • Performance Enhancements
  • How to use a excel sheets as a data base in right time application
  • Create an Excel File
  • Create an Excel file and enter some Data
  • Read an Excel spread sheet
  • Write data to an Excel spread sheet
  • Add formatted data to a spread sheet
  • Sort Excel worksheet
  • Data Driven Testing by fetching Test data from an Excel file
  • Compare Two Excel files
  • Data driven Testing through Data Table methods
Database Object Model
  • ActiveX Data Objects
  • ADODB Connection Object & Recordset Object
  • Test Database Creation & Collecting Test Data
  • Databases Connections (Ms-Access, SQL Server and Oracle)
  • Data Driven Testing by fetching Data from a Database
  • Data Comparisons
Working with Microsoft Word
  • Word Automation Object Model
                                       
Working with Microsoft Internet Explorer & Mozilla FireFox
  • Launching Internet Explorer (IE)
  • Page Synchronization
  • Enumerating all IE Windows
  • Launching a new browser
  • Getting Web page DOM
  • IE and Mozilla Popup Dialogs
  • Handling popup dialog by using a code
  • Checking for Broken images on a Web Page
  • Using a Browser Object as a Window Object
Working with HP Quality Center
  • Quality Center
  • Connecting QTP with QC
  • QC way’s, Relative way’s in QC  & Resolving Relative Paths
  • QCUtil Object
  • QC Open Test Architecture (OTA)
  • The TDConnection Object
  • The Command and Recordset Objects
  • Simple manner of Downloading registers from QC
  • Getting the Current Test Location
  • Enumerating every Tests presents in a Test Lab folder

    Automation Frameworks and Micro Programming with RealTime Implementation
Automation Frameworks: - the real expertise in automation can be just justified through knowledge of other different Automation Frameworks. Simply the knowledge should not be like knowing definitions & going via some PPTs & theoretical docs.
Automation Framework Basics
  • Modular Framework
  • Data Driven Framework
  • Keyword Driven Framework
  • Hybrid Automation Framework
Documentation Related to Automation Test Plan, Automation Framework Design Diagram (Which is always skipped by learners but important to justify your experience in Automation)

Its a theoretical approach that there are 5 types of framework
1) Data Driven
2) Keyword Driven
3) Modular
4) Function Library
5) Hybrid Framework.

But the practical Approach is that All the 4 types are just the quality of Automation Frameworks and In Real Time Scenarios most of the time the Automation Framework is always Hybrid Automation Framework because to fulfill our requirement regarding automation we have should try to get benefits of all the Automation Framework approaches.
 That’s why we are explaining 2 Types of Hybrid Framework (requirement, situation and approach would not be different) and one Pure Keyword Driven Framework.
       And our manner is mentioned below
1) Requirement and situation where it should be used for each type of Framework.
2) Designing the Framework in Classes from Scratch
3) Explanation of code line by line during classes and some.
4) We Would give you real time assignment that will make you
    expert in every Automation framework.
5) At Last would discuss about initiatives can be taken.
6) Technical Help during training and beyond training period to
    Implement the framework
7) Would provide all the scripts and code regarding All the Frameworks.

MS Excel - Macro Programming:- We can use macro programming which is based on VBScript. and not tough to learn after learning VBScript and MS Excel Automation Interface which will be covered after 10 Classes.
This will us to make Automation utilities which is being used frequently now in industry.
How to Test the Mobile Application Performance


In the Loadrunner select the supported Protocol Script for Mobile Testing

Wireless
  • i-mode
    NTT DoCoMo’s technology for accessing the Internet on a mobile phone system.
  • Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS)
    Multimedia Messaging Service – used for sending MMS messages between mobile devices.
  • VoiceXML
    A standard for voice-based communication between applications.
  • WAP
    Wireless Application Protocol – used for Web-based, wireless communication system is used amongst mobile devices and content providers.
Posted by Precise Testing Solution | 00:01 | 1 comment
Introduction to Database Resource Monitoring
You monitor DB2, Oracle, SQL Server, or Sybase database resource usage
during a scenario run using LoadRunner’s Database Server Resource
monitors.
The DB2, Oracle, SQL Server, or Sybase database server resource monitors
measure statistics for DB2, Oracle, SQL Server, or Sybase database servers.
During a scenario run, you use these monitors to isolate database server
performance bottlenecks.
For each database server, you configure the measurements you want to
monitor before running your scenario. To run the DB2, Oracle, and Sybase
monitors, you must also install the client libraries on the database server
you want to monitor.

Oracle Monitoring
The Oracle monitor displays information from Oracle V$ tables: Session
statistics, V$SESSTAT, system statistics, V$SYSSTAT, and other table counters
defined by the user in the custom query.
The SiteScope Oracle JDBC Monitor monitors the server performance
statistics from Oracle Database servers. You can monitor multiple
parameters or counters with a single monitor instance. This allows you to
watch server loading for performance, availability, and capacity planning.
You can create a separate Oracle JDBC Monitor instance for each Oracle
database server in your environment.
To obtain data for this graph, you must first set up the monitoring
environment. You then configure the Oracle online monitor (from the
Controller) and select the measurements you want to display, before
running the scenario.
This chapter includes:
➤ Setting Up the Monitoring Environment on page 
➤ Adding a Machine to Monitor on page 
➤ Configuring the Oracle Monitor on page 
➤ Oracle Performance Counters on page 
➤ Custom Queries on page 

Note: The port you use to monitor an Oracle server through a firewall
depends on the configuration of the Oracle server. Configuration
information for the connection between the client and server is located in
the Oracle client tnsnames.ora file.
Setting Up the Monitoring Environment
➤ If you are using the SiteScope monitor engine, ensure that SiteScope has
been installed on a server. You can install SiteScope on the same machine as
the Controller, or on a dedicated server.
➤ The Oracle server measures information from the V$SESSTAT and
V$SYSSTAT Oracle V$ tables, and other table counters defined by the user in
the custom query. In order to monitor the Oracle server, you must set up the
monitoring environment as described below before you can configure the
monitor.
To set up the native LoadRunner Oracle monitor environment:
1 Ensure that the Oracle client libraries are installed on the Controller
machine.
2 Verify that %OracleHome%\bin is included in the path environment
variable. If it is not, add it.
3 Configure the tnsnames.ora file on the Controller machine so that the
Oracle client can communicate with the Oracle server(s) you plan to
monitor.
You can configure connection parameters either manually, by editing the
tnsnames.ora file in a text editor, or using the Oracle service configuration
tool (for example, select Start > Programs > Oracle for Windows NT >
Oracle Net8 Easy Config).
You specify:
➤ a new service name (TNS name) for the Oracle instance
➤ TCP protocol
➤ the host name (name of monitored server machine)
➤ the port number (usually 1521)
➤ the database SID (the default SID is ORCL)
For example:


Note: Only the 32-bit Oracle client should be installed on the Controller
machine running the Oracle monitor. If you have a 16-bit and a 32-bit
Oracle client installation on the Controller machine, the 16-bit installation
should be uninstalled.

4 Obtain a username and password for the service from your database
administrator, and ensure that the Controller has database administrator
privileges for the Oracle V$tables (V$SESSTAT, V$SYSSTAT, V$STATNAME,
V$INSTANCE, V$SESSION).
5 Verify connection with the Oracle server by performing tns ping from the
Controller machine.
Note: here may be a problem connecting if the Oracle server is behind a
DMZ/firewall that limits its communication to application servers accessing
it.


6 Ensure that the registries are updated for the version of Oracle that you are
using and that they have the following key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ORACLE
7 Verify that the Oracle server you want to monitor is up and running.
Note: It is possible to monitor several Oracle database servers concurrently.
8 Run SQL*Plus from the Controller and attempt to log in to the Oracle
server(s) with the desired username/password/server combination.
9 Type SELECT * FROM V$SYSSTAT to verify that you can view the
V$SYSSTAT table on the Oracle server. Use similar queries to verify that you
can view the V$SESSTAT, V$SESSION, V$INSTANCE, V$STATNAME, and
V$PROCESS tables on the server. Make sure that the Oracle bin directory is
in the search path.
10 To change the length of each monitoring sample (in seconds), you need to
edit the dat\monitors\vmon.cfg file in the LoadRunner root folder. The
default rate is 10 seconds.
Note: The minimum sampling rate for the Oracle Monitor is 10 seconds. If
you set the sampling rate at less than 10 seconds, the Oracle Monitor will
continue to monitor at 10 second intervals.
If a problem occurs in setting up the Oracle environment, view the error
message issued by the Oracle server.

To set up the SiteScope Oracle JDBC monitor environment:
1 You must have a copy of the applicable Oracle JDBC database driver file (for
example, classes12.zip) on the SiteScope server.
Copy the downloaded driver file into the <SiteScope install
path>\SiteScope\java\lib\ext subdirectory. DO NOT unzip the file.
Stop and restart the SiteScope service after copying the driver file to the
SiteScope machine.
Note: More than one driver file is available for download. Some drivers
support more than one version of Oracle database (for example, the
classes12.zip Oracle JDBC thin driver) while others only support a particular
version. If you are monitoring a recent version of Oracle database, you
should download the latest version of the database driver.
2 You must supply the correct Database Connection URL, a database
username and password when setting up the monitor. The syntax of the
Database Connection URL usually has the form of:
jdbc:oracle:thin:@<tcp address>:<tcp port>:<database sid>.
For example to connect to the ORCL database on a machine using port 1521
you would use:
jdbc:oracle:thin:@206.168.191.19:1521:ORCL
Note: The colon and @ symbols must be included as shown.
3 You must specify the Oracle Database Driver that was installed on the
SiteScope server when setting up the monitor. The Database Driver for the
Oracle thin JDBC driver is:
oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver

4 You should only have one Oracle client installed on the SiteScope machine.
If there is more that one client installed, SiteScope may report an error and
be unable to connect to the database.
5 You must have an Oracle user login that SiteScope will use to access the
Oracle server. In order to retrieve the Oracle database counters, the user that
SiteScope will use for the Oracle JDBC Monitor should be able to execute all
the SQL statements as found in the file
SiteScope\templates.applications\commands.oraclejdbc.
Adding a Machine to Monitor
In order to monitor the Oracle database resources of a particular machine
from the Controller, you need to add the machine and the measurements
that you want to monitor.
To add a machine to the Controller
1 Click the Oracle graph in the graph tree, and drag it into the right pane of
the Run view.
2 Right-click the graph and select Add Measurements, or click anywhere on
graph and choose Monitors > Add Measurements. The Oracle dialog box
opens.
3 By default, LoadRunner monitors Oracle database resources using the native
LoadRunner monitor engine.
If you want to monitor the Oracle database using a SiteScope monitor, click
Advanced.
In the Choose Monitor Engine dialog box, choose SiteScope, and click OK
to close the Monitor Engine dialog box.

4 In the Monitored Server Machines section, click Add. The Add Machine
dialog box opens.
➤ In the Monitored Machine Information section, enter the server name or
IP address of the machine you want to monitor. Select the platform on
which the machine runs.
➤ In the SiteScope Server Information section, enter the SiteScope machine
name, and port (default: 8888), and specify whether you are using a
Secure HTTP connection. If you are using a SiteScope account, fill in the
relevant account information.
Note: If you are adding a native LoadRunner monitor, the SiteScope
Server Information section does not appear.
Click OK to close the Add Machine dialog box.
5 In the Resource Measurements on: <machine> section of the Oracle dialog
box, click Add.
6 Continue with Configuring the Oracle Monitor below.
Configuring the Oracle Monitor
The configuration for this monitor differs slightly depending on whether
you are adding a SiteScope or native LoadRunner monitor.
This section describes:
➤ Configuring the Native LoadRunner Oracle Database Monitor
➤ Configuring the SiteScope Oracle JDBC Monitor

Configuring the Native LoadRunner Oracle Database Monitor
After you have added the machine that you are monitoring, you configure
the monitor by choosing which objects to monitor on the machine.
To configure the Oracle Database monitor:
1 When you click Add to add a measurement, the Oracle Logon dialog box
opens.
Enter the following information, and then click OK.
➤ Login Name. Enter your login name.
➤ Password. Enter your password.
➤ Server Name. Enter the name of the server.
2 The Add Oracle Measurements dialog box opens, displaying the available
measurements.

3 For each measurement, select an object, measurement, and instance, and
then click Add, as described in “Understanding the Add Oracle
Measurements Dialog Box” below.
For a description of the available measurements, see “Oracle Performance
Counters” on page 247.
4 Click Close. The measurements that you selected appear in the Resource
Measurements on: <machine> section of the Oracle dialog box.
5 Click OK in the Oracle dialog box to activate the monitor.
Note: By default, the database returns the absolute value of a counter.
However, by changing the IsRate setting in the dat\monitors\vmon.cfg file
to 1, you can instruct the database to report a counter’s rate value—the
change in the counter per unit time.
Understanding the Add Oracle Measurements Dialog Box
The Add Oracle Measurements dialog box lets you select the resources to
monitor from the V$SESSTAT and V$SYSSTAT Oracle V$ tables.
➤ Object. Select the object being monitored on the specified machine.
➤ Measurements. Select a resource measurement to monitor. Select multiple
measurements using the CTRL key. For an explanation of each
measurement, click Explain.
➤ Instances. If multiple instances of the selected measurement are running,
select one or more instances to monitor for the selected measurement.
➤ Explain. Displays a description of the selected measurement.
Configuring the SiteScope Oracle JDBC Monitor
After you have added the machine that you are monitoring, you choose the
measurements to monitor on the machine.
To configure the Oracle JDBC monitor:
1 The first time you add a measurement to the monitor, you need to configure
the monitor properties. When you click Add to add a measurement, the
Configuring Oracle JDBC Monitor dialog box opens.
Enter values for the monitor properties as described in “Understanding the
Configuring Oracle JDBC Monitor Dialog Box” on page 246, and click OK.


Understanding the Configuring Oracle JDBC Monitor Dialog Box
You use the Configuring Oracle JDBC Monitor dialog box to configure the
Oracle JDBC monitor.
➤ Instance. Enter the database SID. For example, ORCL.
➤ Database Connection URL. Enter the connection URL to the database you
want to monitor. For example, jdbc:oracle:thin:@206.168.191.19:1521:ORCL
➤ Database User Name. Enter the user name that SiteScope should use to
connect to the database.
➤ Database Password. Enter the password for the user name that SiteScope
should use to connect to the database.
➤ Database Driver. Enter the driver used to connect to the database. For
example, oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver.
➤ Connection Timeout. Enter an optional the time out value, in seconds, that
SiteScope should to wait for a database connection to respond.
➤ Query Timeout. Enter an optional the time out value, in seconds, that
SiteScope should to wait for a response from the database query. If the
database does not respond within the period specified, SiteScope will report
an error.
➤ Update every. Select how often the monitor should read the server statistics.
The default interval is to run or update the monitor once every 10 seconds.
Notes:
➤ The sum of the Connection Timeout value and Query Timeout value
should always be less than the Update every value for the monitor.
➤ Notes:
➤ The sum of the Connection Timeout value and Query Timeout value
should always be less than the Update every value for the monitor.
➤ Some commonly used databases and database drivers do not support the
Query Timeout feature. In these cases the Query Timeout value should be
set to zero.
Understanding the Oracle Configuration Dialog Box
The Oracle Configuration dialog box enables you to select the performance
counters to monitor.
➤ Host. The name of the host machine.
➤ Measured Components. Displays a tree containing all the available
measured components.
➤ Performance Counters. Displays the performance counters for a selected
measured component.
➤ Component/Counter Description. Displays a description of the selected
measured component or performance counter.

Custom Queries
Using the custom query feature, you can define your own query to the
Oracle database and view the result of this query—a single numerical
value—in the Oracle online monitor graph. By defining your own query,
you can monitor not only the V$SYSSTAT and V$SESSTAT table counters
that are currently provided by the Oracle monitor, but other tables that
contain useful performance information as well.

To create a custom query:
1 In the third line of the vmon.cfg file, CustomCounters=, indicate the
number of custom counters you want to create.
2 Create a new section in the vmon.cfg file for the new counter. Each section
has the following format:
[Custom2]
Name=Number of sessions
Description=This counter returns the number of sessions active.
Query=SELECT COUNT(*) FROM V$SESSION
IsRate=1
3 In the [Custom#] line, assign the next number in the sequence of counters
to the new custom counter. The custom counters must be in consecutive
order, beginning with the number 0.
4 In the Name line, enter the name of the new counter.
5 In the Description line, enter the description of the counter that you want
the help message to contain.
6 In the Query line, enter the text of the SQL query (on one line of the
vmon.cfg file) that returns exactly one row from the database. This row
must contain one column, a numerical value. Custom queries should not
exceed 512 characters.
7 In the IsRate line, enter 0 if you want the database to report the counter as
an absolute number. If you want the database to report the change in the
counter per unit time, enter 1. Custom queries cannot return negative
values.

Thursday, 29 September 2011

Microsoft IIS Monitoring

This Web Server Resource monitor displays statistics about the resource
usage on the Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) during the scenario
run.
To obtain data for this graph, you need to configure the MS IIS online
monitor (from the Controller) and select the measurements you want to
display, before running the scenario. You select measurements for the
Microsoft IIS Server monitor using the MS IIS dialog box.
Note: To monitor an IIS server through a firewall, use TCP, port .
This chapter includes:
➤ Adding a Machine to Monitor on page
➤ Configuring the Microsoft IIS Monitor 
➤ Microsoft IIS Performance Counters 

Adding a Machine to Monitor
In order to monitor the Microsoft_IIS server from the Controller, you need
to add the machine and the measurements you want to monitor.
To add a machine to the Controller:
1 Click the MS IIS graph in the graph tree, and drag it into the right pane of
the Run view.
2 Right-click the graph and select Add Measurements, or click anywhere on
the graph and choose Monitors > Add Measurements. The MS IIS dialog box
opens.
In the Monitored Server Machines section, click Add. The Add Machine
dialog box opens.
3 Enter the server name or IP address of the machine you want to monitor.
Select the platform on which the machine runs, and click OK.
4 In the Resource Measurements on: <machine> section of the MS-IIS dialog
box, the default measurements are displayed.
➤ To delete a measurement from the default list, select the measurement
and click Delete.
➤ To select additional measurements, click Add. A dialog box opens
displaying all the available measurements.
For a description of the available measurements, see “Microsoft IIS
Performance Counters” on page 151.
Note: To change the default counters for the Microsoft IIS Server
monitor, see “Changing a Monitor’s Default Counters”.
5 Continue with Configuring the Microsoft IIS Monitor below.

Configuring the Microsoft IIS Monitor
After you have added the machine that you are monitoring, you configure
the monitor by choosing which objects to monitor on the machine.
1 When you click Add to add a measurement, the MS IIS dialog box opens
displaying the Web Service object, its counters, and instances opens.
For each measurement, select an object, counter, and instance, and then
click Add, as described in “Understanding the MS IIS Dialog Box” on.
For a description of the available measurements, see “Microsoft IIS
Performance Counters” .
Note: To change the default counters for the Microsoft IIS Server monitor,
see “Changing a Monitor’s Default Counters”.
2 Add all the desired resources to the list, and click Close.
3 Click OK in the MS IIS dialog box to activate the monitor.

Understanding the MS IIS Dialog Box
The MS IIS dialog box lets you select the items to monitor on the MS IIS
server.
➤ Object. Select the object being monitored on the specified machine.
➤ Counters. Select a resource counter to monitor. Select multiple counters
using the CTRL key. For an explanation of each counter, click Explain.
➤ Instances. If multiple instances of the selected counter are running, select
one or more instances to monitor for the selected counter.
➤ Explain. Displays a description of the selected counter.

The Fire wall server’s online monitor measures the executions of a Firewalls server during scenarios execution, which enables discontinuity of server’s performance choke points.
The Check Point of FireWall-1 monitor displays statistics about the resource usage on Check Point's Fire Wall during the scenario executions
In this chapter involves:
Configure setup for Monitoring .
Adding Machine to the Monitor
Configuring the Checks Point FireWall-1 Server Monitors
Check Point FireWall-1 Performance Counters
Settings up the Monitoring atmosphere
To obtain performance data, you must activate the Firewall server monitor (before executing the scenario) & indicates which statistics or measurements you required to monitor.

Adding Machine to the Monitor
In manner to monitor the Check Point FireWall-1 resource of a specific machine from the Controller, you required adding the machine & the mensuration’s that you need to a monitor.

Add a machine to the Controller’s:
1 Clicks on the Check Point FireWall-1 graphs in the graph’s tree, and pull it into right pane of the execute view.
2 Right click on the graph or selects the Add Measurements, & clicks in anywhere on the graph or choose Monitors > Add Measurements. The Check Points FireWall-1 dialog box is open.
In the Monitored Server Machines section, click Add. The Add Machine dialog box opens.
3 Enters the server name & IP address of the machine you requires to a monitor.
Selects the platform on which the machines runs, & clicks on OK.
Note: You can specify a machine name or port number in the Add Machine dialog box using the following format:
<Machine name> :< port number>
4 In Resource Measurement’s section of Check Point FireWall-1 dialog box, clicks on Add.
5 Continue with the Configuring of the Check Point FireWall-1 Server’s Monitor below.

Configuring the Check Points of the FireWall-1 Server Monitor’s
To monitor of the Check Points FireWall-1 servers, you must selects the counters, you requires the Check Point of FireWall-1 server monitor to measure (from the Controller). You can select these counters used with the Check Points FireWall-1 SNMP Resources dialog box.
To configures the Check Point FireWall-1 server monitor:
1 The Check Points of the FireWall-1 SNMP instrument (resources) dialog box is open.
2 Browse the FireWall-1 Objects list or select the measurements you required to the monitor, same as explained in “Understands the Checkpoint FireWall-1 Dialog Box”.
For an explanation of the present measurements, see “Check Point FireWall-1 Performance Counters” .
3 Add all the desired resources to the list, and click Close.
4 Click OK in the Check Point FireWall-1 dialog box to activate the monitor.
Improving the Level of Measurement in information.
You can improve the steps of measurement of information for the Check Point FireWall-1 monitor through enabling the measurements with the string of the values to be listed (in addition to measuring with the numeric values), & through enabling the name of the modifiers (which displaying the string of the values as an identifying a part of measurements name).
In the following examples of measurements use the name of the modifier and the string value of the Processes Name (sched) are displayed in addition to its example ID (0):
To potentially this feature, add the following line to the <Load Runner root
folder>\dat\monitors\snmp.cfg files:
SNMP-show-string-nodes=1
Usages Note: You can select more or more name of modifiers, but in the first hierarchy, it will be used. Each time the Check Point FireWall-1 is Add.
Measurements dialog box opens, the information is re-read from the snmp.cfg files. You cannot add the same measurement twice (once with the name of modifier or once without it). If you do so, an error messages is issued.

Understanding the Check Point FireWall-1 Dialog Box
The Check Points of the FireWall-1 dialog box, let's you select the Check Point FireWall-1 server resources to monitor by the using of Simple Network's Management Protocols (SNMP).
Check Point FireWall-1 SNMP Objects. Select all required object or clicks on Add. Click Explains for the ID number or a description of the selected objects.
Explains. Displaying a explanation of selected objects.

Note: The Check Points of the FireWall-1 monitor can only monitors to the 25 measurements.
Windows Resource Monitoring

The Windows Resources monitor shows the Windows resources measured
during the scenario. Windows measurements correspond to the built-in
counters available from the Windows Performance Monitor.
Note: To monitor a Windows machine over a firewall, use TCP, port .
This chapter includes:
➤ Setting up the Monitoring Environment on page 
➤ Adding a Machine to Monitor on page 
➤ Configuring the Windows Resources Monitor on page 
➤ Windows Resource Performance Counters on page 

Setting up the Monitoring Environment
➤ If you are using the SiteScope monitor engine, ensure that SiteScope has
been installed on a server. You can install SiteScope on the same server as
the Controller, or on a dedicated server.
➤ If you want to monitor a remote Windows server that does not use Windows
domain security, you must authenticate the Controller on the remote
Windows server. To authenticate the Controller, create an account, or
change the password of the account used to log on to the Controller so that
it matches the password and user name used to log on to the remote
monitored Windows machine. When the remote Windows machine
requests another machine’s resources, it sends the logged-in user name and
password of the machine requesting the resources.
Adding a Machine to Monitor
In order to monitor the Windows resources of a particular machine from the
Controller, you need to add the machine and the measurements that you
want to monitor.
To add a machine to the Controller:
1 Click the Windows Resources graph in the graph tree, and drag it into the
right pane of the Run view.
2 Right-click the graph and select Add Measurements, or click anywhere on
the graph and choose Monitors > Add Measurements. The Windows
Resources dialog box opens.
3 By default, LoadRunner monitors Windows resources using the native
LoadRunner monitor engine.
If you want to monitor Windows resources using the SiteScope monitor
engine, click Advanced.
In the Choose Monitor Engine dialog box, choose SiteScope, and click OK
to close the Monitor Engine dialog box.

4 In the Monitored Server Machines section, click Add.
The Add Machine dialog box opens.
➤ In the Monitored Machine Information section, enter the server name or
IP address of the machine you want to monitor. Select the platform on
which the machine runs.
➤ In the SiteScope Server Information section, enter the SiteScope machine
name, and port (default: 8888), and specify whether you are using a
Secure HTTP connection. If you are using a SiteScope account, fill in the
relevant account information.
Note: If you are adding a native LoadRunner monitor, the SiteScope
Server Information section does not appear.
Click OK to close the Add Machine dialog box.
5 Click Add in the Resource Measurements on: <machine> section of the
Windows Resources dialog box.
6 Continue with “Configuring the Windows Resources Monitor” on page .
Configuring the Windows Resources Monitor
The configuration for this monitor differs slightly depending on whether
you are adding a native LoadRunner or SiteScope monitor.
This section describes:
➤ Configuring the Native LoadRunner Windows Resources Monitor
➤ Configuring the SiteScope Windows Resources Monitor
Configuring the Native LoadRunner Windows Resources
Monitor
1 When you add a machine in the Windows Resources dialog box, the default
measurements are displayed in the Resource Measurements on: <machine>
section.

Note: To change the default counters for the Windows machine monitor,
see “Changing a Monitor’s Default Counters” .
➤ To delete a measurement from the default list, select the measurement
and click Delete.
➤ To select additional measurements, click Add.
2 A Windows Resources dialog box opens displaying the available Windows
resources.
For each measurement select an object, counter, and instance, as described
in “Understanding the Add Windows Resources Measurements Dialog Box”, and then click Add.
For a description of the available measurements, see “Windows Resource
Performance Counters” 
3 When you have finished selecting the measurements to monitor, click
Close. The counters that you selected appear in the Resource Measurements
on: <machine> section of the Windows Resources dialog box.
4 Click OK in the Windows Resources dialog box to activate the monitor.
Configuring the SiteScope Windows Resources Monitor
The first time you add measurements you need to configure the remote
machine properties. When you click Add in the Resource Measurements on:
<machine> section of the Windows Resources dialog box, the Configuring
NT Remote Machine dialog box opens.
To configure a SiteScope Windows Resources monitor:
1 Enter the remote machine’s configuration information, as described in
“Understanding the Configuring NT Remote Machine Dialog Box” , and click OK.
2 The Configuring PDH Monitor dialog box opens. Verify the Server and
Update every properties, and click OK.
3 The Add Windows Resources Measurements dialog box opens displaying the
available measurements and server properties.













For each measurement select an object, measurement, and instance, as
described in “Understanding the Add Windows Resources Measurements
Dialog Box” on page 68, and then click Add.
For a description of the available measurements, see “Windows Resource
Performance Counters” .
Note: To change the default counters for the Windows machine monitor,
see “Changing a Monitor’s Default Counters” on page 395.
4 When you have finished selecting the measurements to monitor, click
Close. The measurements that you selected appear in the Resource
Measurements on: <machine> section of the Windows Resources dialog box.
5 Click OK in the Windows Resources dialog box to activate the monitor.
Understanding the Add Windows Resources
Measurements Dialog Box
The Add Windows Resources Measurements dialog box lets you select the
Windows resources to monitor. The Windows resources correspond to the
built-in counters available from the Windows Performance Monitor.
➤ Object. Select the object to monitor on the specified Windows machine.
➤ Counters/Measurements. Select the resource counter/measurement to
monitor. Select multiple counters using the CTRL key. For an explanation of
each counter, click Explain.
➤ Instances. If multiple instances of the selected counter are running, select
one or more instances to monitor for the selected counter.
➤ Explain. Displays a description of the selected counter.







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Please Follow the link and download the file

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Web Resource Monitors



You obtain information about the performance of your Web server using
LoadRunner’s Web Resource monitor.

 
This chapter includes:
➤ About Web Resource Monitoring on page 

➤ Hits per Second Graph on page 
➤ Throughput Graph on page 
➤ HTTP Responses per Second Graph on page 
➤ Pages Downloaded per Second Graph on page 
➤ Retries per Second Graph on page 
➤ Connections Graph on page 
➤ Connections per Second Graph on page 
➤ SSLs per Second Graph on page


About Web Resource Monitoring
The Web Resource monitor enables you to analyze the throughput on the
Web server, the number of hits per second that occurred during the
scenario, the number of HTTP responses per second, the HTTP status codes
(which indicate the status of HTTP requests, for example, the request was
successful, the page was not found) returned from the Web server, the
number of downloaded pages per second, the number of server retries per
second, the number of open TCP/IP connections, the number of new TCP/IP
connections per second, and the number of SSL Connections per second.
Hits per Second Graph
The Hits Per Second graph shows the number of hits (HTTP requests) to the
Web server (y-axis) as a function of the elapsed time in the scenario (x-axis).
This graph can display the whole step, or the last 60, 180, 600, or 3600
seconds. You can compare this graph to the Transaction Response Time
graph to see how the number of hits affects transaction performance.
Throughput Graph
The Throughput graph shows the amount of throughput on the Web server
(y-axis) during each second of the scenario run (x-axis). Throughput is
measured in bytes and represents the amount of data that the Vusers
received from the server at any given second. You can compare this graph to
the Transaction Response Time graph to see how the throughput affects
transaction performance.
In the following example, the Transaction Response time graph is compared
with the Throughput graph. It is apparent from the graph that as the
throughput decreases, the transaction response time also decreases. The
peak throughput occurred at approximately 1 minute into the step. The
highest response time also occurred at this time.




Retries per Second Graph


The Retries Per Second graph shows the number of attempted Web server
connections (y-axis) as a function of the elapsed time in the scenario (x-
axis). A server connection is retried when the initial connection was
unauthorized, when proxy authentication is required, when the initial
connection was closed by the server, when the initial connection to the
server could not be made, or when the server was initially unable to resolve
the load generator’s IP address.


Connections Graph


The Connections graph shows the number of open TCP/IP connections (y-
axis) at each point in time of the scenario (x-axis). One HTML page may
cause the browser to open several connections, when links on the page go to
different Web addresses. Two connections are opened for each Web server.


This graph is useful in indicating when additional connections are needed.
For example, if the number of connections reaches a plateau, and the
transaction response time increases sharply, adding connections would
probably cause a dramatic improvement in performance (reduction in the
transaction response time).


Connections per Second Graph


The Connections Per Second graph shows the number of new TCP/IP
connections (y-axis) opened and the number of connections that are shut
down each second of the scenario (x-axis).


This number should be a small fraction of the number of hits per second,
because new TCP/IP connections are very expensive in terms of server,
router and network resource consumption. Ideally, many HTTP requests
should use the same connection, instead of opening a new connection for
each request.








SSLs per Second Graph


The SSLs per Second graph shows the number of new and reused SSL
Connections (y-axis) opened in each second of the scenario (x-axis). An SSL
connection is opened by the browser after a TCP/IP connection has been
opened to a secure server.


Because creating a new SSL connection entails heavy resource consumption,
you should try to open as few new SSL connections as possible; once you’ve
established an SSL connection, you should reuse it. There should be no
more than one new SSL connection per Vuser.


If you set your run-time settings to simulate a new Vuser at each iteration
(via the Browser Emulation tab in the Run-Time Settings menu), you should
have no more than one new SSL connection per Vuser per iteration. Ideally,
you should have very few new TCP/IP and SSL connections each second.

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